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About the author jmankowsky

This photo blog features the seasonal changes in nature observed in my own backyard and a variety of local environments. The Wachusett Meadow Audubon Sanctuary in Princeton, MA is often highlighted as a model for the positive effects a small nature preserve can have on the larger environment and the local community. Local sites of historical, cultural and recreational interest are spotlighted as well. All photographs were taken by me. Thank you so much for visiting.

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9 Comments

  1. I spotted that beauty in the first picture. Of course the title gave me a clue. Like how you zoomed in closer and closer with your pictures.

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    1. Thanks. My point and shoot camera gets a bit fuzzy when I zoom that much, but I use it all the time to identify birds. Handy!

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  2. Winter is so beautiful on your photos. I also love the barn, it’s special and charming. And a hawk is wonderful. He/she is balancing wonderfully on one leg.

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    1. Thanks for those kind words, Kaya. I enjoy winter (at least until the end of February, when I start thinking “gardening”).
      Cheers,
      Julie

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  3. I enjoyed seeing this stately and elegant sanctuary, Julie, and all the snow. Lovely to join you and the hawk in the hawk walk today, thank you.

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    1. You are so welcome, Jet! An East Coast storm is on the way–you’ll probably be seeing lots of snow pics from here soon!

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  4. How wonderful and a thrill to see the hawk. The building is beautiful too – it looks rather grand for a barn?

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    1. It was a cow barn that was state-of-the art in the 1920’s. I found this snippet about it in a larger article, which I thought might interest you:

      The Cow Barn

      Built in 1924 by the Crocker family.
      Housed the Crockers prize winning cows.
      The structure of this barn was unusual for the time as it used truss-type construction rather than usual post and beam. This allowed plenty of room to stack loose hay.
      The cow barn had a track system with grappling hooks that allowed mechanized unloading of hay wagons and the piling of loose hay, as bales were not used at this time.
      To move out manure, the Crockers installed an overhead tramway in the milking parlor of the barn. It had a scoop which collected manure and used a tram system to move through the barn and across the stockyard to the manure barn.

      The Crockers later donated all the land to the Audubon. They must have been quite wonderful people!

      Cheers,
      Julie

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  5. How interesting – and sounds elaborate for a barn, but then there were prize-winning cattle living there. Wonderful that the Crockers donated all their land to the Audobon. Thanks so much for the additional information.

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